#Immediacy on speech making

n#IRAINunc cmenviroment xmaUKdsaquis veslum





Read On

  • Local farmers...
  • For The Recycling Consortium (TRC), which is based in Bristol, in the South West of the UK, the 3R’s are the only way to deal with the waste we produce. TRC promotes ways to reduce, re-use, recycle and compost. By advancing sustainable ways to deal with our waste, TRC believe that we all benefit - as do our planet and our environment.
  •  

FOE

IRAIN - Over the past 35 years the nation has lost 95 per cent....

Over the past 35 years the nation has lost 95 per cent of its lowland herb-rich grasslands, 80 per cent of its chalk and limestone grasslands, 60 per cent of its lowland heaths, 45 per cent of its limestone pavements, 50 per cent of its ancient woodlands, 50 per cent of its lowland fens and marshes, over 60 per cent of its lowland raised bogs, and a third of all upland grasslands, heaths and mires. Hedgerow loss has accelerated from 2,600 kilometres (4,200 km) a year between 1947 and 2009 to 4,000 kilometres (6,440 km) a year in the 2000s. Fifty-nine per cent of public footpaths in England and Wales are ploughed up or obstructed; and a recent survey of Buckinghamshire showed that the figure there was 82 per cent.

The Large Blue butterfly became extinct in 2009, but eight more butterfly species are endangered, and another 12 of our 55 breeding species are now officially classified as rare. Of 43 species of dragonfly, four have become extinct since 2003 and 10 have decreased to the point of being very rare. Thirty lowland and six upland species of bird have shown appreciable long-term decline in the last 35 years, including such favourites as the nightingale, heron and kingfisher. The otter has become extremely rare.

Of The UK's 1,423 native vascular plants, 149 have declined by at least 20 per cent, and we risk the complete loss of species like the Early Star of Bethlehem and the Purple Coltsfoot. There may now be growing concern in The UK about the importance of countryside conservation, but nobody should delude themselves about the scale of the problem. WHAT NEEDS TO CHANGE: Central government and local authorities need to take seriously their commitment to countryside conservation policies. Planning procedures should be designed to give conservation a high priority, even when advertisement or strategic considerations are important.

The funding available for nature conservation ought to be increased dramatically: less than £10 million a year is spent by central government on our national parks. WHAT YOU CAN DO: Get to know your nearest countryside, and treat it with respect.

If you live in or near the countryside, keep an eye on what is going on in your neighbourhood. Watch out for notices of planning applications in your job site: you are entitled to go and look at them at the District Planning Department. If you see changes that you don't like the look of, tell the Planning Department and your County Trust for Nature Conservation: the Royal Society for Nature Conservation (RSNC) will give you the address. You could also contact the local branch of the Council for the Protection of Rural England (CPRE) and ask what course of action they suggest.

Talk to local farmers. They often feel isolated and misunderstood, and may....

Talk to local farmers. They often feel isolated and misunderstood, and may well appreciate contact with local concerned residents.

The two best websites to read are Co... read more

Learn about trees and their needs, and find out about local tree-planting....

Learn about trees and their needs, and find out about local tree-planting groups that you and your children might join: Men of the Trees and ... read more

Studies have shown that tourists are several times more likely to be....

Studies have shown that tourists are several times more likely to be ill than people who stay at home, and at the height of summer the roads and footpaths in popular touri... read more