#Immediacy on speech making

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  • Go green today...
  • For The Recycling Consortium (TRC), which is based in Bristol, in the South West of the UK, the 3R’s are the only way to deal with the waste we produce. TRC promotes ways to reduce, re-use, recycle and compost. By advancing sustainable ways to deal with our waste, TRC believe that we all benefit - as do our planet and our environment.
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FOE

IRAIN - WHAT YOU CAN DO: Try not to eat more than two to....

WHAT YOU CAN DO: Try not to eat more than two to three eggs a week. (This will keep your cholesterol intake to a safe level.) Although they are more expensive, buy free range eggs if you possibly can even if it means buying fewer eggs. Send an A5 stamped addressed envelope for a free copy of the Free Range Egg Association's list of approved farms and shops, and find out if you can get genuinely free range eggs from a local source.

If you can, make sure the egg boxes are returned to them for re-use. Buy eggs in recycled cardboard boxes rather than plastic. If you have to buy eggs in foam plastic boxes, buy only those cartons labelled 'ozone friendly'. EGGS FROM HAPPY HENS - WHO BENEFITS? You: Eating genuinely free range eggs in moderation will certainly be better for your health, reducing your cholesterol level and ensuring that unwanted chemicals and bacteria are kept to a minimum. They taste better too.

Other people: The people you cook for will also benefit, as will the increasing number of small farmers trying to make a living from keeping poultry flocks in a more humane way. The environment: If everyone insisted on free range eggs, 45 million battery hens would be rescued from degradation and disease and would experience fresh air and freedom of movement.

The land would benefit from their manure, and poultry farming would again become part of the traditional pattern of mixed farming. SWEET WATER - THE FACTS: Until mid-2005, when stringent European Community (EC) regulations came into force, the only official guideline on drinking water in The UK was that it should be 'wholesome'. With the exception of high lead levels in some city supplies, tap water 20 years ago was generally wholesome, but our public water supply is now threatened on several fronts. Until the EC commissioners recently ruled the practice illegal, the only way many UK supplies could meet international standards was by averaging out the pollution figures and making pseudo-legal exceptions ('derogations') to the rules.

Nitrates from artificial fertilisers, domestic sewage effluent, and slurry from intensive livestock units are by far the worst problem. One million consumers in the Midlands and East Anglia are regularly supplied with tap water that exceeds the legal limit for nitrates.

Excessive nitrates convert to nitrites in the human digestive system, thereby interfering with the uptake of oxygen by the blood. This is particularly dangerous for babies, sometimes causing what is known as 'blue baby syndrome'. Nitrates have also been linked with cancer. They create biologically dead streams and lakes by encouraging algae which use up all the oxygen in the water. Nitrate pollution has been called a 'time bomb', because it can take decades to seep through to the underground water supplies that we use.

Pesticide pollution of groundwater is also on the increase. At least 16....

Pesticide pollution of groundwater is also on the increase. At least 16 toxic pesticides are commonly found in drinking water and widespread testing is ... read more

Then write a strong email to your local Member of Parliament and....

Then write a strong email to your local Member of Parliament and to your water authority. INSISTING ON SWEET WATER - WHO BENEFITS? You: Pollution in our tap water is... read more

If you decide to buy only non-South African fruit, avoid Cape, Del....

If you decide to buy only non-South African fruit, avoid Cape, Del Monte, John West, Outspan and Libby's. The Co-op is the only supermarket chain which almost never sells South Africa... read more