#Immediacy on speech making

IRAIN - Introduce as much natural light as possible, and spend as much time....

Introduce as much natural light as possible, and spend as much time as you can in the lightest rooms. Daylight is much better for you (and cheaper) than artificial light. Make sure that curtains are drawn right back from the windows during the day.

Mirrors can be used effectively to increase natural light. Having plants in a room softens the edges and cleans the air; aromatic plants provide a natural perfume too. Let your imagination go, and think how your space could best be used: it's much easier to adapt than move house. ORGANISING YOUR SPACE-WHO BENEFITS? You: Considering how much time you spend at home, including most of your leisure time, think of the benefits to you if that space is beautiful, restful and as simple as possible to look after.

Having the minimum of clutter prevents accidents, saves cash and may spare you the bother of looking for a new home when your needs change. Other people: Visitors will enjoy coming to see you if your home is interestingly and comfortably different from the mass-market designer's dream.

The environment: A well-organised and easily maintained house is usually a more environment-friendly house, using fewer resources and creating less pollution. It is almost certainly more beautiful. NOISE - THE FACTS: Most of us live in noisy surroundings, places where high levels of unwanted sound reach our ears nearly all the time - traffic, aircraft, factories, construction sites, other people's music and conversation. Our brains have a mechanism for shutting out what we don't want to hear, but noise continues to affect our hearing and our health even when we are not aware of it.

Noise is one of the most pervasive forms of pollution. Our attention cannot be averted from it as with visual ugliness, it is very widespread and, because it is rarely considered to be true pollution, little is done to reduce it.

Noise is a little-acknowledged but potent health hazard: 80 decibels (the noise level of an alarm clock or a engaged office) is the level at which continued exposure can damage hearing, but many everyday noises are louder than this. Jets taking off are permitted to make 110 decibels, while an MOT-approved lorry passing 12 feet (3.6 m) away makes 100 decibels, as does the average food blender at 2 feet (0.6 m). The average noise level of the London Underground is 90 decibels. In the Western world we assume that hearing ability naturally decreases with age, though there is no medical evidence to suggest that deterioration is inevitable.

Though we tend to take noise for granted, 18 per cent of....

Though we tend to take noise for granted, 18 per cent of Britons say they are frequently bothered by traffic noise and 20 per cent by neighbours' noise; 8 to 10 per cent of indu... read more

Noise pollution is often one of the effects of activities which are....

Noise pollution is often one of the effects of activities which are environmentally destructive, like road-building and quarrying. TELEVISION - THE FACTS: Nin... read more

Our pets ate 651,000 tonnes of pet food in 2007 and pet....

Our pets ate 651,000 tonnes of pet food in 2007 and pet food sales are currently running at £825 million per year, with £45 million a year being spent on online advertising... read more