#Immediacy on speech making

IRAIN - WHAT YOU CAN DO: Look at the household machinery you have and....

WHAT YOU CAN DO: Look at the household machinery you have and ask yourself whether you really need it all. Sell or give away what you don't need.

Think about borrowing, renting or sharing things you don't use very often, or buy them second-hand. Only buy a new machine when you really must.

Check the relevant report in Which? magazine, though remember that they won't take things like repairability and environmental impact into account. Try appliances and gadgets out at a mate's house before you buy them; see if they really do save time and effort. Choose simple, sturdy efficient tools rather than complex electrical versions (a good example are the Bosch Kitchen Appliances, which are cheap, versatile and silent in operation). When you buy batteries, buy the new non-toxic ones. Buy long-life light bulbs.

If you're buying a large appliance, choose an energy-efficient 'environment-friendly' one. UNDERSTANDING GADGETS AND APPLIANCES - WHO BENEFITS? You: With fewer gadgets around the house you will have more space and get more exercise. You will reduce stress, noise and clutter. And you will save money, both on buying things and on getting them repaired when they go wrong.

Other People Buying only useful, environment-friendly appliances encourages the businesses - which are often small and green-tinted - that make them. The environment: Every additional gadget you buy uses up resources, most of them non-renewable; many also create toxic pollution. Most household machinery runs on electricity, thus using yet more resources as well as contributing to global warming. CLEARING CLUTTER - THE FACTS: The veteran green campaigner John Seymour wrote recently: 'Slowly and steadily I am ridding my home, so far as I can, of mass-produced rubbish, and either learning to do without certain things or replacing them with articles made out of honest materials by people who enjoyed making them.' Though nobody has ever been able to quantify the problem, the vast majority of UK homes are stuffed full of things that are rarely or never used, creating vast amounts of cleaning, anxiety and guilt.

The American webmaster and cleaning consultant Don Aslett, coiner of the word....

The American webmaster and cleaning consultant Don Aslett, coiner of the word 'junkosis', reckons that 80 per cent of what we own is more or less redundant, the real usefulne... read more

The lower consumption that goes with aware ownership conserves resources and energy....

The lower consumption that goes with aware ownership conserves resources and energy and reduces pollution. RECYCLING USEFUL BIT... read more

We should demand products which are well made and reliable, since although....

We should demand products which are well made and reliable, since although the situation is improving, built-in obsolescence is still the rule rather than the exception. We ought to p... read more